Real estate data integration for multi-channel marketing

The tightest definition of multichannel customer management I have yet found is:

Multichannel customer management refers to the design, deployment, coordination, and evaluation of channels through which firms and customers interact, with the goal of enhancing customer value through effective customer acquisition, retention, and development.

Neslin, et al. have authored a definitive research article that real estate firms can use to understand the challenges pertaining to “modern” real estate practices relating to client relationship, and agent relationship, issues. The research paper explores five primary challenges and analyzes the issues pertaining thereto.

Neslin begins by identifying the challenges:

[F]ive major challenges for managers: (1) data integration, (2) understanding consumer behavior, (3) channel evaluation, (4) allocation of resources across channels, and (5) coordination of channel strategies.

This post is first in a four or five part series that will explore Neslin’s position and extrapolate such to real estate marketing and client relationship best practices.

Neslin begins by identifying multitudinous ways by which consumers engage retail firms–from kiosks, call centers, catalogs, bricks-and-mortar stores, etc. Similar interaction vehicles are true for real estate firms–front-yard signs, websites, office walk-ins, etc. Next, Neslin defines “channel”

By “channel,” we mean a customer contact point, or a medium through which the firm and the customer interact.

He then sets the basis for his study: that the focuse of MCM is on the customer, as MCM is a customer-centric function. Neslin next identifies major phases of a client interaction

First, customer perceptions and preferences drive channel choices (e.g., the customer may prefer the Internet for search because it is easy to use). Second, the customer learns from and evaluates his or her experiences, which feed back into the perceptions and preferences that guide his or her next shopping task (e.g., the customer may learn that the Internet search did not answer all the important questions). Third, the customer chooses both channels and firms, so from the customer perspective, it is a two-dimensional choice.

The relevant question then is: to harness this consumer interaction data, what investments must a firm make regarding such? What Neslin argues is that firms do not necessarily have to invest in processes that involve “full data integration” in a quest to develop a “single view” of a customer. What this suggests, then, is that firms must make strategic investments in data acquisition a key points in a transaction.

Real estate firms can leverage key consumer data acquisition “channels” or points. First, any point where a consumer registers for information is a channel. This real estate site contains at least 15 registration opportunities for clients during key phases of a transaction: from beginning (click-to-chat) to contacting an agent to book a showing appointment. Of course, many firms already have this data. So what’s the next step?

Data overlays.

That is, real estate firms should consider augmenting this core consumer registration data with real time, or post-transaction data overlays, from data aggregation companies like Experian, Acxiom, Equifax, etc. These overlays take the form additional demographics, psychographics, household income levels, lifestage, etc, data elements.

Another form of consumer data can be supplied by real estate agents. Although somewhat rare, some agents actually keep client profiles (likes, desires, familial relationships). Why? Because thes agents know that understanding a client’s profile allows them to serve this client (and like clients) at a degree somewhat higher than the norm. These agents use these profiles as their competitive differentiator.

Creating client profiles (either at the per record level, or aggregate level) should be considered a first step for any real estate firm that’s serious about multi-channel management. By using such profiles firms can engage clients at a more relevant and informative level. Thus, maximizing the return on investment the customer is making by spending time on the real estate firm’s site. Similarly, a firm maximizes its own return on investment by allocating tight marketing resources in a more intelligent and cost-conscious manner.

2 Comments

  1. Emily Jones says:

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